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QUICK MENU CLICK FOR CHAPTER 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 MAINTENANCE 3 FUEL SYSTEM 4 IGNITION AND ELECTRICAL 5 LUBRICATION AND COOLING 6 POWERHEAD 7 LOWER UNIT 8 TRIM AND TILT 9 REMOTE CONTROLS 10 HAND STARTERS 11 MODELS COVERED ANODES (ZINCS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28 JET DRIVE BEARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 INSPECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28 LUBRICANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 SERVICING.......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28 LUBRICATION INSIDE THE BOAT . . . . . . . 2-7 BATTERIES.......................... 2-31 LUBRICATING THE MOTOR............ MAINTENANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 POWER TRIM/TILT RESERVOIR . . . . . . . . 2-1 0 STORAGE.......................... 2-33 TESTING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-32 BOAT MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 BATTERIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 FIBERGLASS HULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 INTERIOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 BREAKER POINT IGNITION SYSTEM . . . . . 2-41 ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42 REPLACEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42 TESTING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42 CDI/CDI IGNITION SYSTEMS. . . . . . . . . . . . 2-43 INSPECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-43 CLEARING A SUBMERGED MOTOR . . . . . . 2-80 COMPRESSION TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35 CHECK............................ 2-35 LOW COMPRESSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-36 COOLING SYSTEM.................... 2-11 FLUSHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 FLUSHING (JET DRIVES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 ELECTRICAL SYSTEM CHECKS . . . . . . . . . 2-44 BATTERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44 STARTER MOTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44 WIRING HARNESS. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44 ENGINE COVERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 REMOVAL & INSTALLATION............ 2-11 ENGINE IDENTIFICATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 ENGINE MODEL & SERIAL NUMBERS. . . . 2-3 ENGINE MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 ANODES (ZINCS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28 COOLING SYSTEM................... 2-11 ENGINE COVERS.................... 2-11 ENGINE OIL (2-STROKE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 ENGINE OIL AND FILTER (4-STROKE).... 2-15 FUEL FILTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 JET DRIVE IMPELLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27 PROPELLER........................ 2-20 TIMING BELT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30 ENGINE OIL (2-STROKE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 CHECKING......................... 2-15 FILLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 RECOMMENDATIONS................ 2-13 ENGINE OIL & FILTER (4-STROKE) . . . . . . . 2-15 CHECKING LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 OIL CHANGE & FILTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 RECOMMENDATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 FIBERGLASS HULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 INSPECTION & CARE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 FUEL FILTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 FUEL SYSTEM CHECKS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44 CARBURETORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-45 FUEL.............................. 2-44 FUEL PUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-45 GEARCASE (LOWER UNIT) OIL.......... 2-7 CHECKING LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 DRAINING AND FILLING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 OIL RECOMMENDATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 GENERAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 BEFORE/AFTER EACH USE. . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 ENGINE IDENTIFICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 MAINTENANCE COVERAGE . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 MAINTENANCE EQUALS SAFETY . . . . . . . 2-2 OUTBOARDS ON SAIL BOATS.......... 2-2 IDLE SPEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-46 ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-46 INTERIOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 INSPECTION & CARE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 JET DRIVE BEARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 BEARING LUBRICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 GREASE REPLACEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 RECOMMENDED LUBRICANT . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 JET DRIVE IMPELLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27 CHECKING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27 INSPECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-27 LUBRICATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 GEARCASE (LOWER UNIT) OIL......... OUTBOARDS ON SAIL BOATS. . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 POWER TRIM/TILT RESERVOIR. ......... 2-1 0 FLUID LEVEUCONDITION............. 2-10 RECOMMENDED LUBRICANT.......... 2-10 PROPELLER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20 GENERAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 INSPECTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 2-24 REMOVAL & INSTALLATION............ 2-24 RE-COMMISSIONING.................. 2-79 REMOVAL FROM STORAGE . . . . . . . . . . . 2-79 SPARK PLUG WIRES................ .. 2-41 REMOVAL & INSTALLATION............ 2-41 TESTING........................... 2-41 SPARK PLUGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-37 HEAT RANGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-37 INSPECTION & GAPPING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40 READING PLUGS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-39 REMOVAL & INSTALLATION............ 2-38 SPECIFICATIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-82 CAPACITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-87 FUEL: OIL RATIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-88 GENERAL ENGINE................... 2-82 GENERAL ENGINE SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . 2-84 LUBRICATION SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-86 MAINTENANCE INTERVALS. . . . . . . . . . . . 2-85 MODEL ID DECODER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-86 SPARK PLUG DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-92 TUNE-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-89 STORAGE........................... 2-77 RE-COMMISSIONING........ . . . . . . . . . 2-79 WINTERIZATION..................... 2-77 TIMING AND SYNCHRONIZATION . . . . . . . . 2-47 GENERAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-47 TIMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-47 PREPPING THE MOTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-47 SYNCHRONIZATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-47 TIMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-47 2 HP.............................. 2-48 3 HP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-49 4/5 HP (83/1 03CC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-49 6/8 HP.................... . . . . . . . . . 2-50 9.9 HP 4-STROKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-52 9.9/15 HP 2-STROKE................. 2-53 20/25 HP (395CC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-55 20/25 HP (430CC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-57 25/30 HP (496CC 2-CYLINDER) . . . . . . . . . 2-57 40 HP (2-CYLINDER) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-58 48/55 HP (2-CYLINDER) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-59 25/30 HP (496CC 3-CYL.) .............. 2-61 28J-50 HP (698CC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-63 50-70 HP (849CC) & 65J-90 HP (1140CC).. 2-63 45/50 HP (4 CYL., 4-STROKE) . . . . . . . . . . 2-66 V4/V6 MOTORS WITH CDI............. 2-70 V4/V6 MOTORS WITH YMIS............ 2-73 TIMING BELT . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 2-30 INSPECTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30 TUNE-UP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34 BREAKER POINT IGNITION SYSTEM . . . . 2-41 CDI/CDI IGNITION SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . 2-43 COMPRESSION TESTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35 ELECTRICAL SYSTEM CHECKS . . . . . . . . 2-44 FUEL SYSTEM CHECKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44 IDLE SPEED ADJUSTMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . 2-46 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34 SPARK PLUG WIRES................. 2-41 SPARK PLUGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-37 TUNE-UP SEQUENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34 TUNE-UP SEQUENCE . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 2-34 VALVE CLEARANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-74 VALVE LASH........................ 2-74 VALVE LASH.................. . . . . . . . 2-74 ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-74 WINTERIZATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 2-77 PREPPING FOR STORAGE............ 2-78 GENERAL INFORMATION (WHAT EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MAINTENANCE) At Seloc, we estimate that 75% of engine repair work can be directly or indirectly attributed to lack of proper care lor the engine. This is especially 2. Lubrication Service-alter the basic inspections that you should perform each time the motor is used, the most frequent form of periodic 2·2 MAINTENANCE & TUNE-UP true of care during the off-season period. There is no way on this green earth lor a mechanical engine, particularly an outboard motor, to be left sitting idle lor an extended period of time, say lor six months, and then be ready lor instant satisfactory service. Imagine, if you will, leaving your car or truck lor six months, and then expecting to turn the key, having it roar to life, and being able to drive off in the same manner as a daily occurrence. Therefore it is critical lor an outboard engine to either be run (at least once a month), preferably, in the water and properly maintained between uses or lor it to be specifically prepared lor storage and serviced again immediately before the start of the season. Only through a regular maintenance program can the owner expect to receive long life and satisfactory performance at minimum cost. Many times, if an outboard is not performing properly, the owner will "nurse" it through the season with good intentions of working on the unit once it is no longer being used. As with many New Year's resolutions, the good intentions are not completed and the outboard may lie for many months before the work is begun or the unit is taken to the marine shop lor repair. Imagine, if you will, the cause of the problem being a blown head gasket. And let us assume water has found its way into a cylinder. This water, allowed to remain over a long period of time, will do considerably more damage than it would have if the unit had been disassembled and the repair work performed immediately. Therefore, if an outboard is not functioning properly, do not stow it away with promises to get at it when you get time, because the work and expense will only get worse the longer corrective action is postponed. In the example of the blown head gasket, a relatively simple and inexpensive repair job could very well develop into major overhaul and rebuild work. Maintenance Equals Safety OK, perhaps no one thing that we do as boaters will protect us from risks involved with enjoying the wind and the water on a powerboat. But, each time we perform maintenance on our boat or motor, we increase the likelihood that we will lind a potential hazard before it becomes a problem. Each time we inspect our boat and motor, we decrease the possibility that it could leave us stranded on the water. In this way, performing boat and engine service is one of the most important ways that we, as boaters, can help protect ourselves, our boats, and the friends and family that we bring aboard. Outboards On Sail Boats Owners of sailboats pride themselves in their ability to use the wind to clear a harbor or lor movement from Port A to Port B, or maybe just lor a day sail on a lake. For some, the outboard is carried only as a last resort-in case the wind fails completely, or in an emergency situation or lor ease of docking. Therefore, in some cases, the outboard is stowed below, usually in a very poorly ventilated area, and subjected to moisture and stale air-in short, an excellent environment lor "sweating" and corrosion. II the owner could just take the time at least once every month, to pull out the outboard, clean it up, and give it a short run, not only would he/she have "peace of mind" knowing it will start in an emergency, but also maintenance costs will be drastically reduced. Maintenance Coverage In This Manual At Seloc, we strongly feel that every boat owner should pay close attention to this section. We also know that it is one of the most frequently used portions of our manuals. The material in this section is divided into sections to help simplify the process of maintenance. Be sure to read and thoroughly understand the various tasks that are necessary to keep your outboard in tip-top shape. Topics covered in this section include: 1. General Information (What Everyone Should Know About Maintenance)-an introduction to the benefits and need for proper maintenance. A guide to tasks that should be performed before and alter each use. maintenance you will conduct will be the Lubrication Service. This section takes you through each of the various steps you must take to keep corrosion from slowly destroying your motor before your very eyes. 3. Engine Maintenance-the various procedures that must be performed on a regular basis in order to keep the motor and all of its various systems operating properly. 4. Boat Maintenance-the various procedures that must be performed on a regular basis in order to keep the boat hull and its accessories looking and working like new. 5. Tune-Up-also known as the pre-season tune-up, but don't let the name fool you. A complete tune-up is the best way to determine the condition of your outboard while also preparing it lor hours and hours of hopefully trouble-free enjoyment. 6. Winter Storage and Spring Commissioning Checklists-use these sections to guide you through the various parts of boat and motor maintenance that protect your valued boat through periods of storage and return it to operating condition when it is time to use it again. 7. Specification Charts-located at the end of the section are quickreference, easy to read charts that provide you with critical information such as General Engine Specifications, Maintenance Intervals, Lubrication Service (intervals and lubricant types) and Capacities. Engine Identification + See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 From 1984 to 1996 Yamaha produced an extremely large number of models with regards to horsepower ratings, as well a large number of trim and option variances on each of those models. In this service guide, we've included all of the 1-3 cylinder inline models (of both 2 and 4-stroke designs), as well as the V4 and V6 2-strokes. We chose to do this because of the many similarities these motors have to each other. But, enough differences exist that many procedures will apply only to a sub-set of these motors. When this occurs, we'll either refer to the differences within a procedure or, if the differences are more significant, we'll break the motors out and give separate procedures. In order to prevent confusion, we try to sort and name the models in a way that is most easily understood. In many cases, it is simply not enough to refer to a motor as a 25 hp model, since in these years Yamaha produced as many as 4 different motors with that rating (the 395cc 2-cylinder, the 430cc 2-cylinder, the 496cc 2cylinder AND the 496cc 3-cylinder). This makes proper engine identification important lor everything from ordering parts to even just using the procedures in this manual. Throughout this manual we will make reference to motors the easiest way possible. In some cases procedures will apply to all 2-strokes or all 4strokes, in other cases, they will apply to all 1-cylinder or all 2-cylinder motors (or all 3 or 4-cylinder motors, or perhaps all V6 motors, as applicable). When it is necessary to distinguish between different types of motors with the same number of cylinders, we'll differentiate using the Hp rating or, since different motors may have the same rating, we'll use the Hp rating plus the size (and in the case of the 496cc 25hp motor, the number of cylinders). In most cases, mechanical procedures will be similar or the same across different Hp ratings of the same engine family (of the same size). So it won't be uncommon to see a title or a procedure refer to 9.9/15 hp (246cc) motors or 105J-225 hp (2596cc) motors. In both cases, we would be referring to all the motors of a particular family, including all B (Inshore), C, P (Pro), S (Saltwater) or V (V-Max) motors or other special models. To help with proper engine identification, all of the engines covered by this manual are listed in the General Engine and General Engine System Specifications charts at the end of this section. In these charts, the engines are listed with their respective engine families, by horsepower rating, number of cylinders, engine type (2-or 4-stroke), years of production and displacement (cubic inches and cubic centimeters or CCs). But, whether you are trying to tell which version of a particular horsepower rated motor you have in order to follow the correct procedure or are trying to order replacement parts, the absolute best method is to start by referring to the engine serial number tag. For all models covered here this ID tag (in the accompanying figure) is located on the side of the engine clamp or swivel/tilt brackets (port or starboard side depending upon the year and MAINTENANCE & TUNE-UP 2-3 model). Most models are also equipped with a date of manufacture tag (located on the opposite side of the clamp or swivel/tilt bracket). Lastly, some models, mostly larger and later-model motors are also equipped with an Emissions Control Information label as well. ENGINE MODEL & SERIAL NUMBERS + See Figures 1, 2 and 3 The engine model numbers are the manufacturer's key to engine changes. These alpha-numeric codes identify the year of manufacture, the horsepower rating, gearcase shaft length and various model/option differences (such as Saltwater, Pro-Series or V-max and starting/trim tilt options such as manual start/manual tilt or electric start power trim/tilt). If any correspondence or parts are required, the engine model number must be used for proper identification. Remember that the model number establishes the model year for which the engine was produced, which is often not the year of first installation. Also, keep in mind that a date of manufacture may be the year prior to the designated model year. The engine model number tag also contains information used by the manufacturer internally as an engine family designation and a serial number (a unique sequential identifier given ONLY to that one motor). When present, the emissions control information label states that the motor is in compliance with EPA emissions regulations for the model year of that engine. And, more importantly, it gives tune-up specifications that are vital to proper engine performance (that minimize harmful emissions). The specifications on this label may reflect changes that are made during production runs and are often not later reflected in a company's service literature. For this reason, specifications on the label always supercede those of a print or electronic manual. Typical specifications that are found on this label will include: • Spark plug type and gap. • Fuel recommendations. • Idle speed settings • Possibly engine ignition liming (such as wide-open throttle and/or idle timing) specifications Deciphering The Model Code on 1986·90 Engines + See Figure 6 Engines built for the 1984-90 model years contain a 5-11 digit code for identification. If the code begins with an alpha designation, it represents a model that is part of a variation family (such as CV, Pro, counter-rotating L models and For FT 4-stroke models). The next one, two or three digits will be numbers, representing the horsepower rating. The digit following the horsepower rating will be a one, two or three digit alpha code identifying the various trim/model types (such as E for electric start, T for power trim or power trim and tilt or M for tiller controls). Following the model identifier may be a single alpha identifier (S, L, or X in these years) representing gearcase shaft length. Next, a single-digit, alpha identifier is used for the year. And lastly, a code variant of JD is used on Jet Drive models during this year span. Refer to the accompanying illustration to interpret the various alpha identifiers found throughout the model code. Fig. 4 Keep in mind that the date of manufacture is often the year Fig. 5 When present, the emission control information label BEFORE the model year supercedes specifications listed elsewhere 2-4 MAINTENANCE & TUNE-UP Deciphering The Model Code on 1991 and later Engines + See Figure 6 Engines built for the 1991 and later model years contain a model code similar to that of earlier year production models, however there are more variations and therefore more possible codes. Most 1991 and later models will contain a 6-9 digit code. The code may or may not begin with a one or two digit alpha model description. This tells you what series (Inshore, C, Pro, Saltwater, etc) to which the engine belongs. The next one, two or three digits will be numbers, representing the horsepower rating. The digit following the horsepower rating will be a single digit alpha code identifying the starting and trim/tilt system on the motor (E, M, Tor P). Following the starting and trim/tilt system identifier will be a single alpha identifier (S, L, X, U or J) representing gearcase shaft length (or type in the case of J for Jet Drive). Next, a singledigit, alpha identifier is used for the year. Finally, in some cases, a single check digit is used by the manufacturer to designate the 3-cylinder version of the 25 hp motor. Refer to the accompanying illustration to interpret the various alpha digits found throughout the model code. Before/After Each Use As stated earlier, the best means of extending engine life and helping to protect yourself while on the water is to pay close attention to boat/engine maintenance. This starts with an inspection of systems and components before and after each time you use your boat. A list of checks, inspections or required maintenance can be found in the Maintenance Intervals Chart at the end of this section. Some of these inspections or tasks are performed before the boat is launched, some only after it is retrieved and the rest, both times. + See Figures 7 and 8 Both before each launch and immediately after each retrieval, visually inspect the boat and motor as follows: 1. Check the fuel and oil levels according to the procedures in this manual. Do NOT launch a boat without properly topped off fuel and oil tanks YAMAHA MODEL IDENTIFICATION DECODER Model Prop Shaft HP T rim/Tilt Method Shaft Method of Control Model Year Code Variant G) or 2 I B = Inshore Series I Numerals I C = C Series A number between 1986-90 @ S = 15" 1991-03 N = 1984 2 = 3 D=Twin 2= 2 E = Electric Start H =Tiller K = 1985 OX = Twin I EFI and L = 20" J = 1986 3 = 3 E = Enduro Series 250 = 250 T = Power Trim or R= Remote H = 1987 F= 4-Stroke Power Trim/Tilt X= 25" G= 1988 1984-90 FT = 4-Stroke I Thrust F = 1989 JD = Jet Drive L = Left-Hand Rotation M= Tiller U = 30" 0 = 1990 LF = Left-Hand 14-Stroke p = 1991LX Left- Hand I EFI 1991-03 @ 1991-03 Q = 1992 LZ = Left-Hand I HPDI E = Manual Tilt J = Jet Drive R = 1993 P = Pro Series Model wl Electric Start s = 1994 PX = Pro Series I EFI T = 1995 S = Saltwater Series M = Manual Tilt u = 1996 SX = Saltwater Series I EFI wl Manual Start V= 1997 T = 4-Stroke I Thrust W= 1998 V = V-Max Series T = Power Trim/Tilt X= 1999VX = V-Max I EFI wl Electric Start Y= 2000VZ = V-Max I HPDI z = 2001 Z= HPDI P= Power Tilt A= 2002 wl Electric Start B = 2003